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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

1 edition of Son preference and its effect on fertility in India found in the catalog.

Son preference and its effect on fertility in India

Son preference and its effect on fertility in India

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  • 29 Currently reading

Published by International Institute for Population Sciences, East-West Center Program on Population in Mumbai, Honolulu, Hawaii .
Written in English

    Places:
  • India.
    • Subjects:
    • Sex of children, Parental preferences -- India.,
    • Fertility, Human -- India.,
    • Sex ratio.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 31-35).

      StatementRangamuthia Mutharayappa ... [et al.].
      SeriesNational family health survey subject reports,, no. 3
      ContributionsMutharayappa, R., International Institute for Population Sciences., Program on Population (East-West Center)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHQ755.83 .S66 1997
      The Physical Object
      Pagination35 p. :
      Number of Pages35
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL325992M
      LC Control Number97906953

      Impact of son preference on fertility indice in Manipur. Son preference, fertility and family structure: evidence from reproductive behavior among Nigerian women (English) Abstract. Strong boy-bias and its consequences for young and unborn girls have been widely documented for Asia.

      BibTeX @MISC{Choe97nationalfamily, author = {Minja Kim Choe and Fred Arnold and T. K. Roy}, title = {National Family Health Survey Subject Reports, No. 3 1 Son Preference and Its Effect on Fertility in India}, year = {}}. Using maximum likelihood estimation, we study the effect of covariates on son targeting fertility behavior in India, a country that displays significant sibling and birth-order effects.

      The focus is on dowries in India, which increase the economic returns to sons and decrease the returns to daughters. The paper exploits an exogenous shift in the cost of girls relative to boys arising from a revision in anti-dowry law, which is shown to have decreased dowry transfers markedly. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Nag, Moni. Sex preference in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan, and its effect on fertility. New York, N.Y.: Population.


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Son preference and its effect on fertility in India Download PDF EPUB FB2

Son preference and its effect on fertility in India. Mumbai: International Institute for Population Sciences ; Honolulu, Hawaii: East-West Center Program on Population, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: R Mutharayappa; International Institute for Population Sciences.; Program on Population (East-West Center).

Preference For Sons, Its Impact on Fertility: An Empirical Study of India (Best in State) Paperback – Decem census, there are 37 million females missing compared to male population. Here, we examined the relationship between son preference and its impact on fertility.

In order to examine the fertility behavior, the Author: N R Prabhakara. The effect of son preference on fertility varies substantially by region and state. The NFHS Subject Reports is a series summarizing secondary analysis of data from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS) in India.

The NFHS collected information from nea Indian women on a range of demographic and health by: Fertility Behaviour and Effect of Son Preference among the Muslims of Manipur, India from India that son preference has pronounced effects on the sex composition of children ever born at the.

Impact of Son Preference on Fertility Indices in Manipur Dilip C. Nath and H. Brojeshwor Singh Guwahati University, India The societies with high fertility rate exposed very less rate of son preference over daughter. But the fertility decline has a linkage of greater demand for son Cited by: 1.

The effect of moderate son preference on family size is analysed using data from the Sri Lanka Contraceptive Prevalence Survey whose respondents were followed-up in the Sri Lanka Contraceptive Survey.

Reported reproductive intentions on desire for additional children were not always reflected in overall contraceptive use. Recently the fertility impact of son preference has further intensified by sex-selective abortion, a relatively new practice that is growing rapidly in some Asian countries.

Sex selective abortion inflates the sex ratio at birth and lowers fertility [ 1 ]. Importantly, in our study some cultural-specific factors such as husbands desire of more children and son preference that have shown to increase the rates of fertility and low use of contraception among women in Pakistan [23–25] seem to have less impact on increased risk of high fertility and poor fertility outcomes among these young women.

Infacing a total fertility rate of over four births per woman, the Vietnamese government introduced a new policy that required parents to have no more than two children. Using data from the Vietnam Population and Housing Censuses from, andI apply a differences-in-differences framework to assess the effects of this policy on family size, son preference, and.

Falling fertility in India has produced two diametrically opposite processes going on simultaneously, the new data shows. One, fertility in the higher age groups (mothers aged 35 and above) has. Fertility intention, a surrogate for son preference, is associated with close to 1 h increase in the additional time a girl spends on housework relative to a boy when the mother desires more children, though the coefficient is only marginally significant in the random-effects.

Using data from the census of India and the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), this paper analyzes trends in child sex ratios ( years of age) and the increase in son preference in India. Latest census data () show that the child sex ratios (females per 1, males) have decreased compared to data from the last five decades.

Abstract Strong boy-bias and its consequences for young and unborn girls have been widely documented for Asia. This paper considers a country in Sub-Saharan Africa and finds that parental gender preferences do affect fertility behavior and shape traditional social institutions with negative effects on adult women's health and well-being.

In India, preference for son is very strong and pervasive and has been frequently cited as one of the major obstacles in reducing the national fertility level. Table 1 depicts that % of mothers considered two to be the ideal number of children.

preference in 19 Indian states and the impact of son preference on fertility The authors offer some policy recommendations. particularly strong in Punjab, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, and Gujarat; it was weakest in Kerala, Delhi, Assam, Goa, Karnataka, and Tamil Nadu. Son.

The societies with high fertility rate exposed very less rate of son preference over daughter. But the fertility decline has a linkage of greater demand for son than daughter. This paper analyses the effect of fertility decline on the sex ratio at birth in various regions of the world including the states and provinces of India and Ch the model forecasts that India will have little sex preference at birth when it reaches the expected fertility level of 2 in Manoj, Son Preference, Fertility Decline and.

Strong boy-bias and its consequences for young and unborn girls have been widely documented for Asia. This paper considers a country in Sub-Saharan Africa and finds that parental gender preferences do affect fertility behavior and shape traditional social institutions with negative effects on adult women's health and well-being.

A cultural preference for sons has been well documented in India, resulting in skewed sex ratios, especially exhibited in northwest India. Previous research has shown that family sex composition is associated with family planning (FP) use and couples’ desire for more children. This study examines family sex composition and fertility and FP behaviors in urban Uttar Pradesh, India; little work.

Indian women are choosing to have fewer children — the total fertility rate (TFR) declined to an all-time low of in after being stable at for the four years from toaccording to the Sample Registration System (SRS) compiled by Registrar General of India (RGI) for SRS is the largest demographic survey in the country mandated to provide annual estimates of.

These are highly variable, from in Tamil Nadu in –6 to in Bihar in –3. There is also a clear decline in the size of effects across the period of study (Kerala being the most obvious exception).

The effect of son preference (F SP) on TFR declined from in –3 to in –6. This pervasive decline could result from two processes.Sex preference in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan, and its effect on fertility (Research Division working papers) [Nag, Moni] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Sex preference in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan, and its effect on fertility (Research Division working papers)Author: Moni Nag. Abstract This paper investigates the effect of the differential pecuniary costs of sons and daughters on fertility decisions.

The focus is on dowries in India, which increase the economic returns to sons and decrease the returns to daughters.